bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2019: D N O S A J J M A M F J
2018: D

 
  Other news for:
Neoplasms
Smoking Cessation
Smoking
 Resources from HONselect
Cancer Patients Vaping in Growing Numbers

By Robert Preidt

THURSDAY, May 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Vaping is gaining a foothold in an unlikely population: New research shows a growing number of cancer patients are using electronic cigarettes.

"The gradual but steady increase is quite striking," said study author Dr. Nina Sanford, an assistant professor of radiation oncology at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. "The high prevalence of e-cigarette use among younger cancer patients and survivors is concerning."

E-cigarette use by cancer patients rose from 8.5% in 2014 to nearly 11% in 2017, according to the analysis of federal government data on more than 13,000 patients.

Among patients younger than 50, the rate of use rose from 23% in 2014 to 27% in 2017.

Use of conventional cigarettes by cancer patients remained stable between 2014 and 2017, according to Sanford.

There is little known about e-cigarette use among cancer patients, she added.

"Because e-cigarettes are relatively new, we don't have the long-term data on their side effects yet," Sanford said in a medical center news release.

It's known that conventional cigarettes can impair healing from surgery and radiation therapy, so it's possible that e-cigarettes may cause similar problems, she noted.

Sanford said patients often ask about e-cigarettes, and she advises them to avoid all kinds of smoking or vaping.

"I don't encourage it, but I also am honest that the jury is still out on what the long-term effects of e-cigarette use are," Sanford said. "These are not an FDA [U.S. Food and Drug Administration]-regulated product. There's wide variation of what goes into them. When you pick up an e-cig in the store, you really don't know what's in it."

Studies of e-cigarettes have just started and it will take decades to know if e-cigarettes cause cancer, she explained.

"It's a new area, and there's just no long-term data on e-cig use so there's going to be a lot of controversy on what to do until more rigorous studies are published, particularly given the diverse entities involved, ranging from cancer organizations to e-cigarette companies," Sanford said.

The study was published recently in the journal JAMA Oncology.

More information

The U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse has more about e-cigarettes.

SOURCE: UT Southwestern Medical Center, news release, May 23, 2019

Copyright © 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=746740

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Neoplasms
Smoking
Substance-Related Disorders
Smoking Cessation
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact