bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2019: J J M A M F J
2018: D N O S A J

 
  Other news for:
Food
Obesity
Weight Gain
 Resources from HONselect
How to Prevent Sneaky Summer Weight Gain

By Robert Preidt

MONDAY, May 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Memorial Day marks the unofficial start of summer vacation -- a season of potato salad, ice cream and, if you're not careful, unwanted weight gain.

But it is possible to avoid packing on the pounds. Just hop on the scale every day, researchers suggest.

The new study included 111 U.S. adults, who weighed themselves every day from mid-November 2017 to early January 2018 and received feedback on their weight changes.

The participants either maintained or lost weight during that end-of-year holiday season. A "control group" of adults who did not do daily self-weighing gained weight, according to the study published in the June issue of the journal Obesity.

Other than being told to try to maintain their weight, the self-weighers received no instructions on how to achieve that goal. That meant they had to decide for themselves how to manage their weight.

"Maybe they exercise a little bit more the next day (after seeing a weight increase) or they watch what they are eating more carefully," study author Jamie Cooper said in a journal news release. "The subjects self-select how they are going to modify their behavior, which can be effective because we know that interventions are not one-size-fits-all."

Cooper is an associate professor of foods and nutrition at the University of Georgia, in Athens.

The study findings support something known as discrepancy theories of self-regulation, according to study co-author Michelle vanDellen, an associate professor of psychology.

"People are really sensitive to discrepancies or differences between their current selves and their standard or goal," vanDellen said in the news release. "When they see that discrepancy, it tends to lead to behavioral change. Daily self-weighing ends up doing that for people in a really clear way."

Other research has shown that pounds piled on during the holidays may linger and contribute to yearly weight gain, Cooper noted. Overweight and obese people are likely to gain the most during the holiday season.

"Vacations and holidays are probably the two times of year people are most susceptible to weight gain in a very short period of time," Cooper said. "The holidays can actually have a big impact on someone's long-term health."

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on healthy weight.

SOURCE: Obesity, news release, May 23, 2019

Copyright © 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=746640

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Adult
Goals
Lead
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact