bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2019: A M F J
2018: D N O S A J J M A

 
  Other news for:
Dietary Fats
Food
 Resources from HONselect
The Saturated Fat Debate Rages On

By Len Canter
HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, March 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It's hard to keep up with the findings from studies on the health effects of saturated fat -- you know, the fat typically found in animal foods, from red meat to whole milk. But one thing's certain.

For every study that finds saturated fats unhealthy, there's another showing that its role in heart disease and other chronic conditions is still open for discussion.

For example, two studies published in 2016 were somewhat contradictory. The first, based on previously unpublished data from a Minnesota trial nearly 50 years earlier, found that replacing saturated fats like butter with vegetable oils high in linoleic acid, such as corn oil, didn't lower the risk of death from heart disease or other causes.

The second study, done at Harvard, followed more than 126,000 people, some for up to 32 years. It said replacing saturated fat is important, but what you replace it with counts just as much. The benefits of unsaturated fats high in omega-3 fatty acids, which are found in walnuts, flax seeds, soybean oil and fish, far outweigh the omega-6 fatty acids in corn oil, that study concluded.

More recently, 2018 research from UTHealth in Houston looked at the saturated fats in dairy foods -- from whole milk to cheese to yogurt -- and found no link between their consumption and heart disease or stroke.

So what should you do today?

The general consensus is still to limit fat, and not replace it with high-carb foods, especially "fat-free" packaged foods that use sugar to improve taste. While some full-fat dairy is fine for most people, no more than 10 percent of your daily calories should come from saturated fat, according to U.S. dietary guidelines. It's also best to remove the visible fat on foods such as beef and the skin on poultry before eating.

More information

Health.gov has more guidelines about saturated fat.

Copyright © 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=742867

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Rage
Heart
Heart Diseases
Acids
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact