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An Outdoor Plan for Walking and Running

By Len Canter
HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, March 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Sweating it out on a treadmill is great, especially when the weather is bad. You might even be motivated by watching exciting vistas on an interactive panel. But to keep a walking or running routine from becoming stale, kick it up a notch by taking your workout outside.

Running or walking in the great outdoors can burn more calories, because you have to work against the wind and you don't have a moving tread to keep you going.

If you're used to monitoring the length of your treadmill workouts on a built-in screen, stay motivated by finding other ways to track your output. If you already have a smartwatch, there's a good chance it has a step counter app already installed. If not, you can download any number of fitness apps that count time and distance, calorie expenditure and more.

If you don't have a smartwatch and are on a tight gadget budget, you can buy an inexpensive pedometer to count your steps. Remember that it takes about 2,000 to 2,500 steps to make a mile, depending on the length of your stride.

Now you're ready to rev up your walking/running. Here are four ideas you can mix and match.

  • To add intensity to your outdoor workout and increase your cardio effort, choose a route with some hills.
  • Pick up the pace with interval training. Alternate two-minute intervals of brisk walking with two minutes of moderate walking. Runners can jog for two minutes and then sprint for 30 seconds. Repeat the pattern for 20 to 30 minutes.
  • Switch up your stride. Alternate between 30 seconds of easy steps and 30 seconds of "monster-sized" steps.
  • Work in some skipping, hopping or jumping at regular intervals.

No matter how hard you're working, take some time to appreciate the scenery and the fresh air. This will give you plenty of motivation to continue.

More information

The American Council on Exercise has more fun facts about walking.

Copyright © 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=742641

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
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The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


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