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Is Your Workplace Making You Fat?

By Serena Gordon
HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Candy dishes, cupcakes and cookies abound in the typical office, so if you're striving to eat healthy, the workplace can be a culinary minefield.

Researchers surveyed more than 5,000 people and found that about one in four working adults said they got food or beverages from work at least once a week. Many of those foods were high in calories, processed grains, and added sugar and salt, according to scientists at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

"People should probably be concerned about all the foods they're getting at work. So many of them are free, but people don't realize that all those free foods do add up to a lot of calories over the week. And, those calories don't necessarily line up well with [healthy] dietary guidelines," said study author Stephen Onufrak. He's an epidemiologist with the CDC's nutrition division.

The study reported that the average worker ate about 1,300 calories of foods obtained at the office every week.

Foods consumed at work included those purchased from vending machines or cafeterias, as well as those eaten for free in common areas, meetings or worksite social events.

Among the top 10 items obtained at work -- either free or purchased -- were coffee, water, soft drinks, sandwiches and potato chips, the study found.

The highest calorie items people got at work -- free or purchased -- included pizza, soft drinks, sandwiches, chips, cookies, brownies, donuts, pastries and burgers.

"Since so many of these foods were free, workplaces can adopt healthy meeting policies that encourage healthy foods that are more in line with workplace wellness efforts," Onufrak said. He added that workplace wellness programs are effective at reducing workplace costs and absenteeism.

Dietitian Samantha Heller said people definitely underestimate the calories they eat at work. "You don't think much about it if you grab a bag of chips in the break room, but that's 150 calories. And if you do it three or four days a week for months, those calories really start to add up," she said.

And the ubiquitous office candy dish? "You grab a pre-wrapped chocolate or two as you walk by and think nothing of the calories," Heller added. "But if you do that a few times every day, slowly those extra calories will put on the pounds."

If your office provides food in meetings, break rooms or a cafeteria, Heller suggested that you ask whoever does the ordering to include some healthy selections.

She also advised that just because cookies and other treats at work are free, it doesn't mean that you have to eat them.

"We don't like to turn down free food, but there are many days it's going to be someone's work anniversary or birthday. You don't have to eat something to celebrate with them," Heller said.

It's easier to forgo office goodies if you're not hungry, she noted. "If you're not hungry, you're more in control," Heller said. "If you can, bring healthy food to work with you."

The study findings were published online Jan. 22 in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has advice on improving your eating habits.

SOURCES: Stephen Onufrak, Ph.D., epidemiologist, nutrition division, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Samantha Heller, M.S., R.D., NYU Langone Health, New York City; Jan. 22, 2019, Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, online

Copyright © 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=741841

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
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Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
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