bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2019: N O S A J J M A M F J
2018: D N

 
  Other news for:
Breast Neoplasms
 Resources from HONselect
At Risk for Breast Cancer? Your Race Matters

By Robert Preidt

FRIDAY, Jan. 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Black women at risk of breast cancer may face a disadvantage because of racial disparities in health care, a small new study suggests.

Ohio State University researchers interviewed 30 white and 20 black women at high risk for breast cancer due to family history and other factors.

The investigators found that black women were less likely than whites to have had genetic testing, to take cancer-protecting medications, or to have had or consider having their breasts or ovaries removed as a preventive measure.

"African-American women faced additional burdens at every step along the risk-management journey," lead author Tasleem Padamsee and colleagues said in a university news release.

For example, 67 percent of white women said they or a relevant family member had undergone genetic testing, compared with just 20 percent of black women.

Such racial disparities have been identified in previous studies, but this study is the first to examine the reasons for those disparities, according to the researchers.

They found that black women were less aware of their options and had less access to information about breast cancer prevention. Only 15 percent of black women had seen a specialist for their breast health, compared with 70 percent of the white women, according to the study. The results were recently published in Ethnicity & Health.

Health disparities are deeply rooted in social factors such as poverty, education and racism, said Padamsee, an assistant professor of health services management and policy.

Solutions to these issues are complex and long-term, she noted. But for now, she said, it's important to inform clinicians about the need to provide risk-management information to all patients and refer women at high risk of breast cancer for genetic testing and specialist care.

"All health care providers could be educated about the relevance of risk information and risk-management options for African-American women, and the current disparities in provision of this information across race," the researchers wrote.

More information

The U.S. National Cancer Institute has more on breast cancer prevention.

SOURCE: Ohio State University, news release, Jan. 14, 2019

Copyright © 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=741576

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Breast
Neoplasms
Breast Neoplasms
Women
Risk
Research Personnel
Family
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact