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People With Movement Disorders May Become Immune to Botox Therapy

By Robert Preidt

FRIDAY, Dec. 28, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Some people who receive botulinum toxin injections for disorders that cause muscle tightness and contractions develop resistance to the treatment, researchers say.

The new study included nearly 600 patients with dystonia or spasticity who had been receiving botulinum toxin type A (commonly known as "Botox") for about three to five years.

The researchers found that about 15 percent of the patients developed an immune response that made the treatment less effective or ineffective.

"People may be able to lessen their chances of developing this response by making sure the dose of the drug in each injection is as low as possible, the time between injections is not shortened and booster injections are avoided," study author Dr. Philipp Albrecht said in a news release from the American Academy of Neurology.

Albrecht is a member of the medical faculty at Heinrich Heine University in Dusseldorf, Germany.

The study findings were published online recently in the journal Neurology.

According to the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS), spasticity is a condition in which certain muscles are continuously contracted, which can interfere with normal movement and speech. Spasticity is usually caused by damage to the portion of the brain or spinal cord that controls voluntary movement.

Dystonia is a complex neurological disorder characterized by involuntary muscle contractions. As many as 250,000 people in the United States have dystonia, making it the third most common movement disorder after essential tremor and Parkinson's disease, the AANS says.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke has more on dystonias.

SOURCE: American Academy of Neurology, news release, Nov. 29, 2018

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=740167

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Movement Disorders
Muscles
Dystonia
Therapeutics
Research Personnel
Nervous System Diseases
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

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