bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2019: J M A M F J
2018: D N O S A J J

 
  Other news for:
Mental Health
Smoking Cessation
Smoking
 Resources from HONselect
Smoking Persists for Americans With Mental Health Ills

By Robert Preidt

THURSDAY, Nov. 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- While more Americans are quitting smoking, researchers find that people with mental health problems are much less likely to kick the habit.

Smokers with mental health issues are only half as likely to quit as those with good mental health, the research team found.

"Overall, tobacco cessation programs have been very successful, but our research suggests that people with mental health problems have not benefited from these," said study senior author Renee Goodwin, of Columbia University.

Goodwin and colleagues analyzed 2008-16 national survey data on tens of thousands of adults. They found that the quitting rate in the past month was about 24 percent among smokers who had serious psychological distress such as feeling nervous, hopeless, worthless, restless or depressed. This compared with 52 percent among those without such distress.

It's possible that people with mental health disorders are less likely to have regular health care, and less likely to be offered treatments to help them quit smoking, the study authors suggested.

"There has been a long-held belief that mental health problems will be exacerbated by quitting smoking and that smoking is helpful to mental health, but increasingly data support just the opposite," said Goodwin, who is with Columbia's School of Public Health.

"It is increasingly clear that tobacco control efforts targeted for those with mental health problems are urgently needed to increase quit rates for this group of smokers and to lower the prevalence of smoking overall," Goodwin said in a university news release.

The findings were published recently in the journal Nicotine and Tobacco Research.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers a guide to quitting smoking.

SOURCE: Columbia University, news release, Nov. 1, 2018

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=739339

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Mental Health
Smoking
Adult
Smoking Cessation
Therapeutics
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact