bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2018: N O S A J J M A M F J
2017: D N

 
  Other news for:
Child Development
Child
Parenting
 Resources from HONselect
School Kids Need Supervision After Classes End

By Robert Preidt

SUNDAY, Aug. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- As parents send their kids back to school, they need to remember the school day includes the hours before and after classes, a leading pediatrician's group says.

Children in grade school and middle school require supervision, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). An adult should be available to get them ready and off to school in the morning, and to supervise them after they come home from school.

If another family member is taking care of your child before and/or after school, make it clear to them that they need to follow your rules about schedules, discipline and homework, the academy said in a news release.

In general, children aged 11 to 12 should not be at home alone after school, but that is the age when parents can start to consider the child's maturity level and other circumstances (such as neighborhood safety) to make that decision, child experts say.

If another adult isn't available to supervise children at home after school, parents should arrange to supervise their children from a distance. Kids should have a set time when they are expected to arrive home and should check in with a neighbor or with a parent by phone or video chat.

If your child is in an after-school program, ask about staff training. The program should have a high staff-to-child ratio, trained staff to deal with any health issues and emergencies, and the rooms and the playground should be safe, according to the AAP.

Good homework and study habits after school are also important. Schedule enough time for homework, and make sure children have a space in their bedroom or another part of the home that is quiet and free of distractions.

Have a rule that the TV and other electronic devices are off during homework time. Be available to help, but never do a child's homework, the AAP advises.

In high school, some teachers ask students to submit homework electronically and perform other tasks on a computer. If your child doesn't have access to a computer or the internet at home, work with teachers and school administration to make other arrangements.

More information

The American Academy of Pediatrics outlines how to know when your child is ready to be home alone.

SOURCE: American Academy of Pediatrics, news release, August 2018

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=736923

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Parents
Adult
Family
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact