bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2018: N O S A J J M A M F J
2017: D N

 
  Other news for:
Brain
Technology, Medical
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Mental Health
 Resources from HONselect
FDA Approves Brain Stimulation Device for OCD

By Robert Preidt

FRIDAY, Aug. 17, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A brain stimulation device to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has received approval for marketing Friday by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Transcranial magnetic stimulation uses magnetic fields to stimulate nerve cells in the brain. The FDA approved it as a treatment for major depression in 2008 and for treating pain associated with certain migraines in 2013.

"Transcranial magnetic stimulation has shown its potential to help patients suffering from depression and headaches," said Carlos Pena, director of the division of neurological and physical medicine devices at the FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health.

"With today's marketing authorization, patients with OCD who have not responded to traditional treatments now have another option," Pena added in an agency news release.

The approval of the Brainsway Deep Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation System was based on a study of 100 OCD patients. Thirty-eight percent of those treated with the device had a more than 30 percent reduction in the severity of their symptoms, compared with 11 percent of those treated with a non-working ("sham") device.

No serious reactions to treatment with the device were reported, according to the FDA.

People with OCD have uncontrollable, reoccurring thoughts and behaviors. About 1 percent of U.S. adults had OCD in the past year, according to the U.S. National Institute of Mental Health. The disorder is typically treated with medication, psychotherapy or both. Most patients respond to treatment, but some continue to have symptoms.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Mental Health has more on OCD.

SOURCE: U.S. Food and Drug Administration, news release, Aug. 17, 2018

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=736876

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Equipment and Supplies
Brain
Therapeutics
Mental Health
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Depression
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact