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  Health Highlights: Aug. 15, 2018

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:

Doctors Remove Contact Lens Embedded in Woman's Eyelid for Years

Doctors recently removed a contact lens that was embedded in a woman's eyelid for nearly three decades after she was hit in the eye while playing badminton.

The woman was 14 at the time and thought she had lost the contact lens. At age 42, she visited an ophthalmologist because her left eyelid had been swollen and drooping for about six months, Fox News reported.

Doctors determined she had a cyst. When they removed it, the cyst broke open and revealed a hard contact lens, according to a paper published recently in the journal BMJ Case Reports.

The woman couldn't recall how the contact lens got there or how long it was there, but her mother remembered that she had been hit in the eye with a shuttlecock during a game of badminton 28 years ago, Fox News reported.

It's not clear why the contact lens only started to cause problems nearly three decades later, the doctors wrote.

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Ancient Gene Protects Elephants From Cancer

An ancient gene that protects elephants against cancer has been pinpointed by researchers and could lead to new ways to treat cancer in people.

The gene destroys cells with damaged DNA, something that can trigger cancer, The New York Times reported.

The findings "might tell us something fundamental about cancer as a process. And if we're lucky, it might tell us something about how to treat human disease," study co-author Vincent Lynch, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Chicago, told The Times.

Due to their size, elephants should be at high risk for tumors, and the lack of cancer in these animals has long intrigued researchers.

In recent years, scientists have started delving into the genes and cells of elephants to find new ways to fight cancer, The Times reported.

The latest findings were published Tuesday in the journal Cell Reports.

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Zika, West Nile Cases Reported in Alabama

Multiple reports of Zika virus and West Nile virus are being investigated by Alabama health officials.

They noted that Zika hasn't been transmitted locally, the New York Post reported.

"To date in Alabama, the Zika virus has only been identified in individuals known to have traveled to areas where Zika is known to be endemic. There has been no local transmission," the state's health agency said in a news release issued Monday.

People can get Zika virus from mosquito bites, sex and blood transfusions, and a pregnant woman can pass it to her baby, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

"Infection with the Zika virus causes only mild symptoms in the majority of the cases, but the biggest risk is to pregnant women," Alabama health officials explained. "Zika is now known to cause birth defects and other poor pregnancy-related outcomes if infection occurs during pregnancy."

West Nile is spread by mosquitoes. Most people who are infected have mild or no symptoms and fully recover, but about 1 in 5 develop a fever and may also have headaches, body aches, vomiting, diarrhea, or a rash, and about 1 in 150 develop serious illness such as inflammation of the spinal cord or brain, the CDC says.

You can protect yourself from mosquito bites by using insect repellents and wearing loose, long sleeve shirts and long pants, the Post reported.

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=736783

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
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The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


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