bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2018: N O S A J J M A M F J
2017: D N

 
  Other news for:
Diabetes Mellitus
Exercise
Physical Fitness
Child
Muscular Diseases
 Resources from HONselect
A Weak Grip May Signal Future Health Trouble -- Even in Kids

By Robert Preidt

MONDAY, Aug. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Weak grip strength in children may point to a higher risk of such health problems as diabetes and heart disease, new research suggests.

In a new study that followed children from 4th grade through 5th grade, a grip-strength test was given to the students at the start of the study. The researchers said that nearly 28 percent of the boys and 20 percent of the girls were classified as having weak grips.

During the study period, those children with weak grips were over three times more likely to remain in poor health or to have declines in health than those with strong grips.

Previous studies have shown that muscle weakness as measured by grip strength is a predictor of poor health in adults, but this is the first to do so in children, according to senior study author Paul Gordon. He is chair of health, human performance and recreation at Baylor University's College of Health and Human Sciences.

"What we know about today's kids is that because of the prevalence of obesity, they are more at risk for developing pre-diabetes and cardiovascular disease than previous generations," Gordon said in a university news release.

"This study gives multiple snapshots over time that provide more insight about grip strength and future risks for developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease," Gordon said. "Low grip strength could be used to predict cardiometabolic risk and to identify adolescents who would benefit from lifestyle changes to improve muscular fitness."

While it's common to encourage healthy eating and aerobic exercise for children, these findings suggest that it's also important to promote muscle strength, he added.

"Given that grip strength is a simple indicator for all-cause death, cardiovascular death and cardiovascular disease in adults, future research is certainly warranted to better understand how weakness during childhood tracks into and throughout adulthood," Gordon said.

"Testing grip strength is simple, non-invasive and can easily be done in a health care professional's office. It has value for adults and children," he concluded.

The study was published Aug. 13 in the Journal of Pediatrics.

While the study uncovered a link between grip strength and health, it didn't prove a connection.

More information

The American Academy of Pediatrics has more on kids' fitness.

SOURCE: Baylor University, news release, Aug. 13, 2018

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=736640

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Risk
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases
Muscles
Death
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact