bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2018: N O S A J J M A M F J
2017: D N

 
  Other news for:
Breast Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Genetics
 Resources from HONselect
Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Genes ID'd

By Robert Preidt

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- More genes associated with an increased risk of triple-negative breast cancer have been identified by researchers.

Until now, only mutations in the BRCA1 gene have been linked with this type of breast cancer.

"Triple-negative breast cancer is an aggressive type of cancer that cannot be treated using targeted therapies," study leader Fergus Couch, a geneticist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., explained in a clinic news release.

"It accounts for 15 percent of breast cancer in the Caucasian population and 35 percent in the African-American population. It is also associated with a high risk of recurrence and a poor five-year survival rate. Our findings provide the basis for better risk management," Couch said.

The researchers conducted genetic tests on nearly 11,000 patients with triple-negative breast cancer and found that mutations in the BARD1, BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2 and RAD51D genes were associated with a high risk for triple-negative breast cancer and a greater than 20 percent lifetime risk of any type of breast cancer among whites. Similar findings were made among blacks.

The team also found that mutations in the BRIP1 and RAD51C genes were associated with a more moderate risk of triple-negative breast cancer.

The findings were published Aug. 6 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

"This study is the first to establish which genes are associated with high lifetime risks of triple-negative breast cancer," Couch said. "While previous studies have found genetic variants in BARD1, BRIP1, PALB2 and RAD51C triple-negative breast cancer patients, the current study shows this in more detail, and identifies new specific and strong associations between the susceptibility genes RAD51D and BARD1, and triple-negative breast cancer risk."

The findings may result in expanded genetic testing to identify women at risk for triple-negative breast cancer and could lead to improved prevention, Couch added.

U.S. National Comprehensive Cancer Network screening guidelines recommend BRCA testing only for patients with a family history of breast cancer or those who are diagnosed at age 60 or younger, the researchers said.

More information

Living Beyond Breast Cancer has more on triple-negative breast cancer.

SOURCE: Mayo Clinic, news release, Aug. 6, 2018

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=736515

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Neoplasms
Breast
Breast Neoplasms
Risk
Id
Research Personnel
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact