bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2018: S A J J M A M F J
2017: D N O S

 
  Other news for:
Emergencies
First Aid
Jogging
Exercise
Sunstroke
Water Pollution
 Resources from HONselect
A Wilderness Expert's Keys to Safety in the Great Outdoors

By Robert Preidt

SATURDAY, Aug. 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Some simple steps can reduce danger when you venture into the great outdoors, an expert says.

"Knowing your limits, not trying to do too much, knowing where you're going and what you might encounter there and being aware of the environment you're in are the best ways to avoid problems outdoors," said Dr. Henderson McGinnis, an expert in wilderness medicine in Winston-Salem, N.C.

"Doing a little preparation before you go and being sensible while you're out there can make all the difference," he added in a news release.

McGinnis is an associate professor of emergency medicine at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, where he is also medical director of the AirCare emergency transport service.

Here are his top wilderness safety tips:

  • Don't count on your cell phone. "You might not have cell service out in the woods, even in places close to populated areas," he warned.
  • Avoid drinking out of streams and rivers. The water may look clean, but it could contain animal waste or other pollutants. "Have your own source of water or a way to purify water," he said.
  • Proper attire and gear are a must. "You should at a minimum wear some sort of supportive shoe, whether it's a trail running shoe or a hiking boot. You definitely don't want to be wearing flip-flops or something that provides no traction or support," McGinnis said. Choose comfortable clothes that will protect you from sun, rain and insects.

How much you carry depends on what you're doing and where you're going. Always carry water and a snack, even on short outings. But if you're going out for a half-day or less, you can apply sunscreen and insect repellent at home and leave the containers behind, McGinnis said.

"If I'm going out for more than a couple of hours I'll take a small backpack or waist pack and maybe a soft shell jacket or another layer of clothing, and definitely a hat and sunglasses this time of year," he said. "Plus enough food and water for however long I'm going to be out."

When it comes to first aid equipment, McGinnis often carries a "boo-boo bag." It's a quart-size plastic storage bag with bandages, some tape, a tube of antibiotic ointment and a couple of steri-strips to close small wounds.

"On a longer trip I'll throw in tweezers or a multi-tool, baby wipes, a little bar of hotel soap, hand sanitizer gel and a SAM splint, which is a thin piece of aluminum with foam coating that you can do a million things with," McGinnis said.

Overall, the key is "having a little foresight to plan for what you might encounter," he said.

More information

The Center for Wilderness Safety offers outdoor safety tips.

SOURCE: Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, news release, July 2018

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=736162

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Water
Emergencies
First Aid
Cells
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact