bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2018: N O S A J J M A M F J
2017: D N

 
  Other news for:
Hematologic Diseases
Emergencies
First Aid
Wounds and Injuries
Wounds and Injuries
Travel
 Resources from HONselect
Giving Plasma During Air Transport May Save Trauma Patients

By Robert Preidt

WEDNESDAY, July 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Giving blood plasma to seriously injured patients en route by helicopter to the hospital can improve their chances of survival, a new study suggests.

The study, led by the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, included 500 trauma patients with severe bleeding.

"These results have the power to significantly alter trauma resuscitation, and their importance to the trauma community cannot be overstated," co-lead study author Dr. Jason Sperry said in a university news release. He is a professor in the departments of surgery and critical care medicine.

The patients were transported by medical helicopter to nine U.S. trauma centers. Most were injured in incidents such as vehicle crashes or high falls.

Plasma -- a liquid that helps blood clot -- is separated from red blood cells and platelets by blood banks. It can last up to a year when frozen, the study authors noted.

Some patients received two units of plasma in the helicopter, while others did not.

After 30 days, about 77 percent of patients who received plasma in the helicopter were still alive, compared with 67 percent of those who did not receive plasma. The plasma recipients also had lower 24-hour and in-hospital death rates, the investigators found.

The patients who received the plasma had faster blood clotting and less need for blood transfusions, according to the study.

Study co-lead author Dr. Francis Guyette said that giving plasma during air transport could help reach trauma care goals set by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine in 2016.

The academies "proposed a national trauma care system that integrates military and civilian trauma systems to achieve zero preventable deaths after injury," said Guyette, an associate professor in emergency medicine.

The study findings were published July 25 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

More information

The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more on bleeding.

SOURCE: University of Pittsburgh, news release, July 25, 2018

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=736073

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Wounds and Injuries
Plasma
Blood
Hemorrhage
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact