bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2018: S A J J M A M F J
2017: D N O S

 
  Other news for:
Environment
Food
 Resources from HONselect
Fatty Fare a Fave for 'Otzi the Iceman'

By Robert Preidt

THURSDAY, July 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Otzi the Iceman had a deep love for high-fat foods, say researchers who analyzed the ancient man's last meal.

The oldest naturally preserved ice mummy was discovered in the Eastern Italian Alps in 1991.

Researchers said their analysis of Otzi's stomach contents offer important clues about the eating habits of people in Europe going back more than 5,000 years, and also reveal clues about their food preparation.

Otzi's last meal showed a "remarkably high proportion of fat in his diet, supplemented with wild meat from ibex and red deer, cereals from einkorn, and with traces of toxic bracken [ferns]," said researcher Frank Maixner. He's with the Eurac Research Institute for Mummy Studies in Bolzano, Italy.

The study was published July 12 in the journal Current Biology.

The high-fat diet was unexpected, but "totally makes sense" due to the extreme environment in which Otzi lived, according to the researchers.

"The high and cold environment is particularly challenging for the human physiology and requires optimal nutrient supply to avoid rapid starvation and energy loss," Albert Zink, also from Eurac Research Institute, said in a journal news release.

"The Iceman seemed to have been fully aware that fat represents an excellent energy source," Zink added.

The wild meat consumed by Otzi was eaten fresh or perhaps dried. The presence of toxic bracken particles could be due to Otzi taking bracken as a way to treat intestinal problems caused by parasites, or by using the leaves to wrap food.

The researchers also discovered traces of Otzi's original digestive bacterial community and plan to try to reconstruct it.

More information

The South Tyrol Museum of Archaeology has more on Otzi.

SOURCE: Current Biology, news release, July 12, 2018

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=735551

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Research Personnel
Diet
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact