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5 Special Splurges That Don't Break the Calorie Bank

By Len Canter
HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- You can splurge from time to time and still lose weight when you choose foods that are lavish but also low-calorie.

The meat in a steamed one-pound lobster has fewer than 100 calories. If you don't want to fuss, order a broiled lobster tail. King crab legs are another succulent favorite that can sub for the lobster. Just don't drown your shellfish in butter. Savor seafood's natural flavors or try a squeeze of lemon or a dash of cocktail sauce.

Oysters are high in protein and minerals, and have only about 7 calories each. Adding a mignonette sauce -- a simple preparation of vinegar, shallots, salt and pepper -- barely adds any more calories. If you don't like oysters raw, try them broiled or baked.

A generous 6-ounce filet mignon has about 300 calories. Even a well-trimmed piece of meat will still have some fat, so stick to this small portion and fill out your meal with healthful veggies, such as steamed broccoli.

Considered by many to be the ultimate splurge, caviar clocks in between 60 and 75 calories per ounce. Whether it's salmon roe on sushi or black beluga, it's hard to eat more than that without breaking the bank, so your diet is unlikely to suffer from this indulgence.

Plump juicy raspberries are one of the most extravagant fruits, yet a cup has only 64 calories and a generous 8 grams of fiber. Dress the berries with a dollop of lightly sweetened Greek yogurt.

These splurges are so calorie-conscious that you could eat them all in one day and still be within strict diet limits.

More information

If you want to choose your own splurges, find the calorie count of just about every food on the Food Composition Database page of the U.S. Department of Agriculture website.

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=735249

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Diet
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


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