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Test-Taking Can Be Tough for Kids With Vision Problems

By Robert Preidt

THURSDAY, June 14, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A lazy eye? Crossed eyes? New research suggests that children with such vision problems may take longer to complete standardized tests.

The study included 85 children, average age 10. Of those, 47 had lazy eye (amblyopia), 18 had been treated for crossed eyes (strabismus), and 20 had no vision issues.

Lazy eye is when one eye does not develop normal sight during childhood, often because of crossed eyes. Without treatment, these children will never see well in that one eye, even with glasses. With crossed eyes, the eyes may cross or drift up or out.

Two percent of American children suffer from lazy eye, while 2 percent to 4 percent have crossed eyes, according to the National Center for Children's Vision and Eye Health.

In the study, the children were told to transfer 40 pre-marked correct answers from a standardized reading test booklet to a multiple-choice answer form as quickly as possible without making mistakes or reading the text.

Children with lazy eye or crossed eyes took 28 percent longer to complete the task than those without eye conditions, said study author Krista Kelly, from the Retina Foundation of the Southwest, in Dallas.

The study was published online June 14 in the journal JAMA Ophthalmology.

Kelly's team noted in a journal news release that they did not test the children to determine if they had dyslexia.

Tina Gao, from the School of Optometry and Vision Science at the University of Auckland in New Zealand, noted in an accompanying commentary that "further research is needed to identify the underlying factors leading to potential visuomotor deficits, and this knowledge can then be used to identify the children who perform significantly worse than the normal range."

According to Gao, "These children can be provided with appropriate and effective treatments for any visual or visuomotor deficits, as well as suitable academic accommodations when needed."

But, she added, "A blanket policy based on hellip; vision history alone, without considering the current performance of the individual child, would not produce equitable outcomes."

More information

The American Academy of Ophthalmology has more on childhood eye diseases and conditions.

SOURCES: JAMA Ophthalmology, news release, June 14, 2018; June 14, 2018, JAMA Ophthalmology, online

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=734823

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Eye
Amblyopia
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Strabismus
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


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