bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2018: S A J J M A M F J
2017: D N O S

 
  Other news for:
Exercise
Physical Fitness
Mental Health
 Resources from HONselect
Money Spurs Those With Heart Disease to Step Lively

By Robert Preidt

WEDNESDAY, June 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Money matters in motivating heart disease patients to do more exercise, new research suggests.

The study included 105 heart disease patients, average age 60, who used wrist-worn step counters for 24 weeks. The participants were divided into two groups.

One group received personalized step goals, daily feedback and $14 each week for the first 16 weeks. They could also lose $2 a day for not achieving step goals. The other group (the "control" group) also used step counters but received no incentives or feedback.

While receiving money, patients in the incentive group significantly increased their physical activity levels, walking about 1,368 more steps per day than those in the control group, the findings showed.

Even after they stopped getting paid, the patients in the incentive group still did about 1,154 more steps per day than those in the control group, the researchers said.

Patients in the control group had no significant change in their physical activity levels, according to the study published online June 13 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

"This is one of the first clinical trials that used financial incentives and found increases in physical activity were sustained even after incentives stopped, a potential sign of habit formation," senior author Dr. Mitesh Patel said in a journal news release. He is an assistant professor in the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.

"A key element of our study was that incentives were designed to leverage the behavioral economic principle of loss aversion, which finds that for the same reward size, most people are more motivated when they are told they might lose a reward than when told they could earn a reward," Patel said.

The study's first author, Dr. Neel Chokshi, said, "There is a lot of interest in using wearable devices to increase activity levels among high-risk cardiovascular patients, but the best way to design these types of programs is unknown."

Chokshi is a cardiologist at the School of Medicine and medical director of the Sports Cardiology and Fitness Program at Penn Medicine.

"Our trial is one of the first to test the use of mobile technology through a home-based program, and found that while wearable devices alone were not effective, combining them with financial incentives and personalized goal-setting significantly increased physical activity levels during the six-month period," he added.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. Regular exercise reduces heart disease patients' risk of cardiovascular events and death by up to 30 percent, but most don't get enough physical activity, the study authors said.

More information

The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more on heart disease and exercise.

SOURCE: Journal of the American Heart Association, news release, June 13, 2018

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=734760

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Heart
Heart Diseases
Motivation
Motor Activity
Reward
Association
Death
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact