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High-Calorie Foods Fit for a Diet

By Len Canter
HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, June 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Not every food you eat has to be low-calorie when you want to lose weight.

There are many nutritious and tasty foods that can help you feel satisfied, rather than deprived, and that's important when you're facing calorie restrictions day in and day out. The key to including them is careful portion control.

Nuts are heart-healthy, especially almonds, walnuts and hazelnuts, but they come in at about 180 calories per ounce, so make that your daily nut limit. You'll often see a portion described as a "handful," but that's too subjective a way to measure them. Use a food scale.

Sweet potatoes have 120 calories per half-cup, but when slow roasted, they don't need any toppings, especially not butter, which could easily double the calories. These vitamin A powerhouses are filling and loaded with many other nutrients, making them a very worthy vegetable among starches.

Yes, olive oil is a fat. However, it's a mono-unsaturated fat, which won't raise your cholesterol level -- unlike saturated fats like butter and lard. Though it's 120 calories per tablespoon, all you need is a drizzle of oil for salad dressing or to saute vegetables or a chicken breast. To be very judicious with your use, use an oil sprayer.

Avocadoes are rich in a wide variety of nutrients and taste rich, too --important when you're trying to eat less. Half a cup of a Hass avocado has about 100 calories. Choose a ripe one and mash it with red onion, cilantro, chopped jalapeno and lime juice for a great guacamole or simply add plain cubes to salads. You can even mash a slice to replace mayonnaise on a sandwich.

Remember that when dieting, enjoying what you eat is important. As long as you track portion sizes, these foods can be on the menu.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases has detailed information on the difference between portion sizes and serving sizes to help you better measure all foods, including healthy high-calorie choices.

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=733624

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Diet
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The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


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