bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2018: N O S A J J M A M F J
2017: D N

  What You Need to Know About Strokes

By Robert Preidt

SATURDAY, May 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Stroke is the leading cause of preventable death in the United States, but a lack of awareness and resources hinder efforts to change that, the American Stroke Association says.

"We must aggressively continue our efforts to reduce stroke, especially in multicultural communities, and to reach people at younger ages," said Dr. Mitchell Elkind, a professor of neurology and epidemiology at Columbia University in New York City and chair of the American Stroke Association.

To mark American Stroke Month in May, the stroke association details a number of facts about stroke.

"There are different types of strokes: ischemic, hemorrhagic and transient ischemic attack (TIA). An ischemic stroke is a clot-caused blockage in an artery to the brain, while a hemorrhagic stroke occurs when an artery ruptures in the brain. A TIA or 'mini-stroke' is caused by a temporary blockage. Eighty-seven percent of all strokes are ischemic," the association said in a news release.

During a stroke, nearly 120 million brain cells die every hour. Compared with the normal rate of brain aging, the brain ages 3.6 years each hour during a stroke. The sooner a patient receives care, the better the chances of recovery.

About 66 percent of strokes are spotted by a bystander, but less than half of Americans know the common warning signs and symptoms of stroke, which can be remembered using the acronym FAST -- (F) face drooping, (A) arm weakness, (S) speech difficulty, (T) time to call 911.

Other stroke symptoms include sudden numbness, sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes, sudden severe headache with no known cause and sudden trouble walking.

The fastest way for stroke patients to receive treatment is by calling 911. Driving to the hospital is a common mistake people make, and it can result in longer wait times before the patient receives care.

One in four stroke survivors suffers another stroke. Prevention is crucial for stroke survivors because second strokes can be more debilitating than first strokes.

Stroke rates are rising among Americans in their 30s and 40s, and the risk of stroke in the Stroke Belt -- an 11-state region in southeastern United States -- is 34 percent higher than in the general population.

High blood pressure is the most common controllable cause of stroke, and nearly half of U.S. adults (about 103 million) have high blood pressure.

Other stroke risk factors include obesity, diabetes, cholesterol, smoking and family history.

Eighty percent of strokes are preventable, and stroke risk can be reduced through lifestyle habits such as healthy eating and being physically active.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke has more about stroke.

SOURCE: American Stroke Association, news release, May 2018

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=733589

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Brain
Association
Risk
Blood
Arteries
Survivors
Hypertension
Smoking
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact