bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2018: N O S A J J M A M F J
2017: D N

 
  Other news for:
Breast Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Prostatic Neoplasms
Genetics
 Resources from HONselect
Breast Cancer Genes a Real Risk for Men, Too

By Robert Preidt

THURSDAY, April 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Few American men are screened for gene mutations that can greatly increase their risk of breast and other types of cancers, a new study reveals.

BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations put women at high risk for breast and ovarian cancers, but these mutations also increase men's risk for certain cancers.

"If a male has a BRCA mutation, their risk of breast cancer increases 100-fold," said senior study author Dr. Christopher Childers. He is a resident physician in the department of surgery at the University of California, Los Angeles School of Medicine.

"But it's not just breast cancer -- BRCA mutations put men at higher risk for often aggressive prostate cancers that occur at younger ages," Childers added in a university news release.

"These mutations have also been associated with other cancers, such as pancreatic cancer and melanoma [skin cancer]," he noted. "It is therefore very important that men at risk of a BRCA mutation get genetic testing, as it can potentially help them detect future cancers and help physicians tailor cancer treatment if they do."

For the new study, Childers and his colleagues analyzed data from the 2015 U.S. National Health Interview Survey. The investigators found that nearly 2.5 million people had received cancer genetic testing. Of those people, nearly three times as many women had testing compared to men -- 73 percent versus 27 percent, respectively.

Further analysis revealed that the rate of testing for BRCA gene mutations in men was one-tenth that of women. There was no gender disparity in other types of cancer gene tests, the findings showed.

The study was published April 26 in the journal JAMA Oncology.

Further research is needed to learn why so few men get tested for BRCA gene mutations and how to increase their rates, said study lead author Kimberly Childers. She is a genetic counselor and regional manager of the Providence Health and Services Southern California's clinical genetics and genomics program.

"Previous studies have shown that men don't necessarily understand the importance of a breast/ovarian cancer gene mutation -- that it is more of a 'feminine' issue -- but this couldn't be further from the truth," she said. "We hope this study will spur broad national educational efforts."

More information

The U.S. National Cancer Institute has more on male breast cancer.

SOURCE: University of California, Los Angeles, news release, April 26, 2018

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=733289

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Neoplasms
Men
Breast
Risk
Breast Neoplasms
Women
Prostatic Neoplasms
Ovarian Neoplasms
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact