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The Truth About Juicing

By Len Canter
HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, May 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Between juice bars and high-powered home juicing machines, drinking your fruits and veggies has certainly gone mainstream.

Depending on the specific mixes you sip -- a vegetable blend, for instance -- juice can be a filling snack when you're on the go. But is juicing a way to lose weight and boost health?

Some juicing proponents claim that your body can better absorb nutrients in juice form. But there's no scientific evidence of this -- or that drinking only the juice of a fruit or vegetable is any healthier than eating the fruit or vegetable itself.

Another claim is that juicing gives your system a break from digesting fiber. But the fact is that most Americans fail to get enough fiber in their daily diet.

There's also a lot of talk about juicing to get rid of toxins. But many health experts say the body removes toxins on its own.

Juices may have some long-term health benefits -- grapefruit, lemon, celery and red grape juices have all been the subject of research. But while experts agree that juices are a good way to get more fruits and vegetables into your diet, they shouldn't be the only source of nutrients, as in a juice fast. No juice is a weight-loss miracle, and fruit juice in particular can cause spikes in blood sugar. Some fruit-based smoothies can also contain hundreds of calories.

If you like making your own juice blends, prepare only as much as you can drink at one time -- harmful bacteria can develop quickly. And if you're in the market for a new juicer, choose one that juices the entire fruit, or else add the pulp back in, to get needed fiber.

More information

Learn more about the pros and cons of juicing at Nutrition.gov.

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=733254

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
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Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


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