bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2018: S A J J M A M F J
2017: D N O S

 
  Other news for:
Food
Obesity
Animals, Domestic
 Resources from HONselect
You and Your Pooch May Have Similar Tummy Bacteria

By Robert Preidt

THURSDAY, April 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The makeup of bacteria in your dog's digestive tract may be more like your own than you think, researchers say.

In a new study, investigators analyzed gut bacteria populations ("microbiomes") in two dog breeds. The findings showed that the genes in the dogs' microbiomes had many similarities with humans. In fact, they were more similar to humans than the microbiomes of pigs or mice.

"The results of this comparison suggest that we are more similar to man's best friend than we originally thought," said study corresponding author Luis Pedro Coelho, from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Heidelberg, Germany.

The report was published online April 18 in the journal Microbiome.

"These findings suggest that dogs could be a better model for nutrition studies than pigs or mice, and we could potentially use data from dogs to study the impact of diet on gut microbiota in humans, and humans could be a good model to study the nutrition of dogs," Coelho said in a journal news release.

The researchers also found that changes in protein and carbohydrate levels in the diet had similar effects on the gut microbiomes of dogs as on humans.

The microbiomes of overweight and obese dogs were more responsive to a high-protein diet than the microbiomes of lean dogs, a finding consistent with the idea that healthy microbiomes are more resilient, according to the study authors.

"Many people who have pets consider them as part of the family and, like humans, dogs have a growing obesity problem. Therefore, it is important to study the implications of different diets," Coelho added.

More information

The University of Utah has more on the human microbiome.

SOURCE: Microbiome, news release, April 18, 2018

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=733038

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Diet
Research Personnel
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact