bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2018: N O S A J J M A M F J
2017: D N

 
  Other news for:
Coronary Disease
Smoking Cessation
Smoking
 Resources from HONselect
Smoking Puts Blacks at Higher Risk for Heart Failure

By Robert Preidt

MONDAY, April 16, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking may significantly increase black Americans' risk of heart failure, a new study warns.

The study included 4,129 black participants who were followed for a median of eight years. Half were followed for a shorter time, half for a longer period. Their average age: 54.

When the study began, none had heart failure or hardening of the arteries, which can lead to heart failure. During the study period, there were 147 hospitalizations for heart failure.

Compared to those who never smoked, smokers had triple the risk of hospitalization for heart failure. That risk was 3.5 times higher for those who currently smoked a pack or more a day. And it was twice as high among those with a history equivalent to smoking a pack a day for 15 years.

The researchers also found a link between current smoking and an enlarged left ventricle -- a sign that the heart's main pumping chamber is not working properly. Changes in its structure and function likely boost heart failure odds, according to study senior author Dr. Michael Hall. He is a cardiologist at the University of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson.

The study was published recently 9 in the journal Circulation.

"Previous research has focused on smoking and atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries, but not enough attention has been given to the other bad effects of smoking on the heart," Hall said in a journal news release.

"With increasing rates of heart failure, particularly among African-Americans, we wanted to look at the link between smoking and heart failure," he added.

Because the study focused on three counties in the Jackson, Miss., area, the findings may not apply to black Americans who live elsewhere, according to Hall.

"Still, the study clearly underscores the harms of smoking and the benefits of quitting," he said. "As health care professionals, we would recommend that all patients quit smoking anyway, but the message should be made even more forcefully to patients at higher risk of heart failure."

About 20 percent of Americans over age 40 are expected to develop heart failure, according to the American Heart Association.

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more on heart failure.

SOURCE: Circulation, news release, April 16, 2018

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=732869

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Heart
Heart Failure, Congestive
Smoking
Risk
Hospitalization
Arteries
Smoking Cessation
Association
Lead
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact