bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2018: S A J J M A M F J
2017: D N O S

 
  Other news for:
Menopause
Postmenopause
Menstruation
Pregnancy Complications
 Resources from HONselect
Women Who Are Most at Risk of Stroke

By Robert Preidt

THURSDAY, Feb. 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Stroke affects more women than men in the United States. And a new study pinpoints stroke risk factors unique to females.

"Many people don't realize that women suffer stroke more frequently than men, and mortality is much higher among women," said Dr. Kathryn Rexrode, the study's corresponding author.

"As women age, they are much more likely to have a stroke as a first manifestation of cardiovascular disease rather than heart attack," said Rexrode, who is with Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston.

The study attempts to better understand susceptibility, she said.

"Why do more women have strokes than men? What factors are contributing and disproportionately increasing women's risk?" Rexrode said in a hospital news release.

Stroke affects 55,000 more women than men each year in the United States. It's the leading cause of disability and the third leading cause of death in women, the researchers said in background notes.

Rexrode's team analyzed the scientific literature and identified several factors that increase stroke risk in women. These include:

  • Menstruation before age 10,
  • Menopause before age 45,
  • Low levels of the hormone dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEAS),
  • Use of birth control pills.

A history of pregnancy complications can also indicate higher stroke risk. These problems include gestational diabetes and high blood pressure during or immediately after pregnancy, the researchers said.

Some of these risk factors are common, and the researchers stressed that few women who have one or more will suffer a stroke. However, they said it's important for health care providers to be aware of any heightened risk.

"These women should be monitored carefully and they should be aware that they are at higher risk, and motivated to adhere to the healthiest lifestyle behaviors to decrease the risk of hypertension (high blood pressure) and subsequent stroke," Rexrode said.

The paper was published Feb. 8 in the journal Stroke.

More information

The National Stroke Association has more on women and stroke.

SOURCE: Brigham and Women's Hospital, news release, Feb. 8, 2018

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=730891

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Women
Risk
Men
Research Personnel
Hypertension
Affect
Pregnancy Complications
Blood
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact