bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2018: S A J J M A M F J
2017: D N O S

 
  Other news for:
Child Development
Child Psychology
Child
 Resources from HONselect
Preemies Get a Slow Start on Friendships

By Robert Preidt

MONDAY, Feb. 12, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- As if preemies didn't face enough struggles, a new study finds they have more difficulty making friends, though things improve once they start school.

"Having friends, playing with them and being accepted is important for social support and personal well-being," said study leader Dieter Wolke. He's a psychology professor at the University of Warwick in England.

"Having fewer friends, feeling less accepted, can lead to feelings of loneliness and increases the risk of being excluded or bullied," Wolke added.

In the study, researchers looked at more than 1,000 children born in Germany in 1985-1986. Of those, 179 were born very premature (under 32 weeks' gestational age), 737 were moderately-to-late premature (born between 32 and 36 weeks) and 231 were healthy full-term babies.

Those who were born premature made fewer friends and socialized less in early childhood. But things improved when they started school, according to the study published in the February issue of The Journal of Pediatrics.

The researchers also found that, at age 6, children who were very premature at birth had an average of four friends, compared with five friends for children born full-term. Very preterm children also saw their friends 15 percent less often than those who were born full-term.

Children with poorer physical and mental abilities, and more emotional problems had fewer friends and were less accepted by other children, the findings showed.

Routine follow-up of premature children should include assessing their social relationships, Wolke suggested.

"Entering school increases social networks and should be a consideration when contemplating delaying school entry for preterm children," Wolke said in a university news release.

"Although most preterm children catch up with their full-term peers during early elementary school, future interventions to improve friendships and social interaction skills should start before school entry to prevent later psychopathology and behavior problems," he recommended.

Parents of premature babies -- especially those with physical and mental impairments -- should be advised on how to help their children with social skills before school age, Wolke said.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on preterm birth.

SOURCE: University of Warwick, news release, Feb. 5, 2018

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=730886

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Psychology
Research Personnel
Emotions
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact