bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2019: S A J J M A M F J
2018: D N O S

 
  Other news for:
Tendon Injuries
Fractures
Osteoporosis
 Resources from HONselect
Many Middle-Aged Men May Have Signs of Thinning Bones

By Amy Norton
HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, May 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Brittle bones are often seen as a woman's health issue, but low bone mass may be more common among middle-aged men than generally thought, a small study suggests.

The research, of 173 adults aged 35 to 50, found that men and women were equally likely to have low bone mass in the hip. It was found in 28% of men and 26% of women.

Those study participants, the researchers said, had osteopenia, or lower-than-normal bone density. In some cases, it progresses to osteoporosis -- the brittle-bone disease that makes people vulnerable to fractures.

The fact that osteopenia was just as common in men came as a surprise, said researcher Allison Ford, a professor of health and exercise science at the University of Mississippi.

Full-blown osteoporosis is clearly more common in women. About one-quarter of U.S. women aged 65 and up have the condition in the hip or lower spine, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That compares with about 5% of men the same age.

But, Ford said, the new findings suggest low bone density might be more common in middle-aged men than appreciated.

"Low bone mineral density and osteoporosis affect men," she said. "They should not be overlooked."

Ford suggested men take steps to help ensure their bones stay healthy -- including eating a well-balanced diet with enough calcium, getting adequate vitamin D, and performing weight-bearing exercise.

Weight-bearing refers to activities that make the body move against gravity. Jogging, dancing, stair-climbing and walking all qualify, according to the National Osteoporosis Foundation.

The findings were published May 28 in the Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. The research was based on bone density scans of 173 men and women. All were recruited from the University of Mississippi or the surrounding community, and most were white.

That's a limitation, Ford noted, because it's not clear whether the prevalence of osteopenia would be the same in a larger, more diverse population.

Ford said the findings "shed light" on low bone density in men, but more research is needed.

According to Dr. Michael Lewiecki, a trustee with the National Osteoporosis Foundation, "There's a general message from this study that's useful. Men can have low bone density and develop osteoporosis, too."

The condition typically manifests later for men. They generally have larger bones than women, and they don't go through the rapid hormonal changes of menopause, noted Lewiecki, who also directs the New Mexico Clinical Research and Osteoporosis Center, in Albuquerque.

Men do, however, see a gradual waning in testosterone, and low testosterone is one contributor to osteoporosis in men, Lewiecki said. Heavy drinking is another risk factor for bone loss, he noted, particularly when it comes to men's risk.

The osteoporosis foundation suggests that men aged 70 and older have their bone density screened, Lewiecki said. It's also recommended for people who break a bone after age 50.

In addition, men should see their doctor if they've lost 1.5 inches or more in height, Lewiecki advised. That could be a sign of a vertebral fracture.

Lewiecki agreed that exercise is one of the keys to maintaining bone health -- not only weight-bearing exercise, he said, but also muscle-strengthening and activities that challenge balance skills.

As for the "don'ts," he said, it's important to avoid smoking and heavy drinking.

More information

The National Osteoporosis Foundation has an overview on osteoporosis.

SOURCES: Allison Ford, Ph.D., professor, health, exercise science and recreation management, University of Mississippi, Oxford, Miss.; E. Michael Lewiecki, M.D., director, New Mexico Clinical Research and Osteoporosis Center, Albuquerque, and trustee, National Osteoporosis Foundation, Arlington, Va.; June 2019, Journal of the American Osteopathic Association

Copyright © 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=746849

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Men
Bone and Bones
Osteoporosis
Bone Density
Women
Aged
Bone Diseases, Metabolic
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact