bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2019: O S A J J M A M F J
2018: D N O

 
  Other news for:
Exercise
Physical Fitness
Occupational Health
 Resources from HONselect
Wellness Programs Take Hold in American Workplaces

By Robert Preidt

WEDNESDAY, April 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly half of U.S. workplaces now offer wellness programs, a new study finds.

"Most American adults work, and many spend half or more of their waking hours at work," said study author Laura Linnan. She's a professor in the department of health behavior at the University of North Carolina's School of Global Public Health.

"Where we work, how long we work, the conditions of our work, who we work with -- all of these factors impact our health," Linnan said in a university news release. "Employers have an opportunity to shape work environments and work conditions in ways that support employee health."

The larger the workplace, the more likely it was to have a wellness program, the survey revealed.

Health promotion programs were offered by 39% of workplaces with 10 to 24 employees, 60% of workplaces with 50 to 99 employees, and 92% of workplaces with 500 or more employees, according to the report.

But the survey also found that many workplace programs focused only on certain areas of health and wellness, rather than taking a comprehensive approach.

Nearly one-third of workplaces offered some type of program to address physical activity, fitness or inactivity.

About one-fifth offered programs to help employees quit tobacco use, and about 17% had weight management/obesity programs, according to the study published April 22 in the American Journal of Health Promotion.

Three factors were independent predictors of having a comprehensive health promotion program: having at least one person assigned to be responsible for the program; a budget; and several years of experience with health promotion programming.

The survey is the most recent national poll of workplace health promotion programs, and the first of its kind in 13 years, the researchers noted.

This survey "identifies gaps in knowledge to help practitioners and researchers set the agenda for future progress in worker and workplace health," Linnan explained.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on workplace health promotion.

SOURCE: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, news release, April 22, 2019

Copyright © 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=745373

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Data Collection
Research Personnel
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact