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When Your Partner Has Erectile Dysfunction

By Len Canter
HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, April 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Men often have a hard time acknowledging erectile dysfunction, or ED. But it can leave their partner feeling confused or even blaming themselves for something not within their control.

First, know that while the odds of ED rise after age 50, many men experience normal physical changes that are not ED. Erections may not be as firm as they once were, and it may take more foreplay to get one. It may help to have sex in the morning, when both partners are full of energy.

True ED is not being able to get or maintain an erection, though this may not happen every time. It can be related to lifestyle habits such as smoking, heavy drinking or being overweight. Stopping harmful habits, losing weight and getting into a regular exercise program can be helpful.

In middle age, ED can often be connected to a medical condition -- such as diabetes, heart disease or Parkinson's -- and new or worsening ED may signal that the condition is getting worse. Erectile dysfunction can also be a side effect of some medications and cancer treatments.

It's also important to know that up to 25 percent men under 40 experience ED, often from a psychological issue, like performance anxiety or depression. But for some, it's an early warning sign of heart disease.

For all of these reasons, encourage your partner to see his doctor or a urologist for sexual problems. It's a difficult subject to bring up, and you may face resistance if he sees ED as a stigma. But remind him that a healthy sex life is part of a healthy relationship, and that it's often possible for a doctor to uncover the underlying cause simply by taking a thorough medical history.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases has more on erectile dysfunction and how it can be diagnosed and treated.

Copyright © 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=743534

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
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The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


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