bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2019: S A J J M A M F J
2018: D N O S

 
  Other news for:
Crohn Disease
 Resources from HONselect
Skin Fungi May Be Tied to Bowel Disease

By Robert Preidt

FRIDAY, March 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Crohn's disease involves inflammation of the digestive tract. But new research into its causes is focusing on fungi commonly found on the skin.

These microscopic fungi, called Malassezia restricta, are linked to dandruff. They're found in oily skin and scalp follicles, but they also end up in the gut. However, it's not known how they get there or what they do.

The fungi may worsen intestinal disorders such as Crohn's disease -- a type of inflammatory bowel disease -- in patients with a certain genetic makeup, according to the study. Crohn's symptoms can include diarrhea, stomach cramping and weight loss.

The study results were published March 5 in the journal Cell Host & Microbe.

"We were surprised to find that Malassezia restricta was more common on intestinal tissue surfaces in Crohn's disease patients than in healthy people," said study co-author David Underhill. He is chair of inflammatory bowel disease at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

"Further, the presence of Malassezia was linked to a common variation in a gene known to be important for immunity to fungi -- a genetic signature more common in patients with Crohn's disease than the healthy population," Underhill said in a journal news release.

Changes in intestinal fungi such as M. restricta -- and how an individual body responds to these fungi -- may help worsen symptoms in some patients with Crohn's disease, said study co-author Jose Limon, a Cedars-Sinai research team member.

The researchers initially found that in mice, the presence of M. restricta worsened colitis, a type of intestinal inflammatory disease.

Further investigation showed that levels of M. restricta were elevated in Crohn's patients who had a genetic variation known as the IBD CARD9 risk allele. This boosts the ability of immune cells to pump out inflammatory signaling molecules in response to M. restricta.

"The data so far do not suggest that the presence of Malassezia in the gut is an inherently bad thing. We found it in some healthy people, and in mice it does not seem to cause disease in the gut by itself," Underhill said. "However, if there is some intestinal inflammation, Malassezia seems to make it worse."

The next step in this research includes determining whether eliminating M. restricta from the intestine in this group of Crohn's patients eases their symptoms.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases has more on Crohn's disease.

SOURCE: Cell Host & Microbe, news release, March 5, 2019

Copyright © 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=743263

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Cells
Inflammation
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact