bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2019: J J M A M F J
2018: D N O S A J

 
  Other news for:
Common Cold
Cough
Influenza
Infection
Occupational Health
Viruses
 Resources from HONselect
How to Decide When You're Too Sick to Work

By Robert Preidt

SUNDAY, Feb. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Even if you think you can go to work when you have a cold or flu, you need to think about others, an infectious disease expert says.

"I see a lot of patients whose jobs and stress make them feel torn between staying home and going in when they're sick," said Dr. Robin Wigmore. She is a primary care physician and infectious disease specialist at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston.

"But viral infections like the common cold and flu are contagious. It's important to consider your co-workers' health as well," Wigmore said in a medical center news release.

To make an informed decision, first consider how long you've been feeling ill.

"You are most contagious in the first 48 hours of a viral illness," Wigmore explained. "This is often even before you begin feeling symptoms."

This means you should stay home at the first sign of symptoms. That will avoid spreading your illness and allow you to rest, stay hydrated and take care of yourself.

Ask yourself if your symptoms are contagious. Viruses can be passed through the air by coughing or sneezing, and some cold and flu germs can survive on surfaces such as countertops, doorknobs and phones for up to 24 hours.

"As a general rule, if you have a wet cough, a runny nose, fevers or aches, you should probably stay at home," Wigmore advised.

If you have a runny nose without aches or fever, you may be suffering from allergies. A dry, "clear your throat" type of cough or tickle may also be allergies or irritation. In that case, it's likely OK to go to work, she said.

"But if your runny nose is accompanied with thick, yellow or green mucus, this is an indication that your body is fighting off an illness," Wigmore noted. "In this case, you should stay home."

Stay home and call your doctor if your throat hurts and you have aches, including headache, and/or you see white patches on your tonsils. This could be strep throat.

If your temperature is higher than 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit, that's a strong sign of infection -- and maybe the flu. In that case, "you should call your doctor and stay home," Wigmore said. "It is often best -- and many times, company policy -- that employees stay out of work until they are fever-free for 24 hours, especially with the flu."

Nasal congestion with sinus or facial pain indicates a sinus infection. Sinus infections can be viral or bacterial. Viral sinus infections are often contagious. "Either way, it's best to stay home," Wigmore added.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on colds and flu.

SOURCE: Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, news release, Jan. 31, 2019

Copyright © 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=742383

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Infection
Pain
Nose
Cough
Fever
Hypersensitivity
Communicable Diseases
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact