bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2018: N O S A J J M A M F J
2017: D N

 
  Other news for:
Food
Hypertension
Child
Obesity
Body Weight Changes
 Resources from HONselect
Kids Without Access to Good Food Face High Blood Pressure Risk

By Robert Preidt

THURSDAY, Sept. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Poor nutrition increases a child's risk of high blood pressure, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed national health survey data for 2007 to 2014 from more than 7,200 U.S. kids between 8 and 17 years of age.

More than one-fifth lacked good access to nutritious foods, and more than 12 percent overall had high blood pressure.

Among kids with poor nutrition, 14.4 percent had high blood pressure, compared to 11.6 percent among those with nutritious food available.

When obesity and other factors were taken into account, lack of access to nutritious food was still associated with an increased risk of high blood pressure, according to the study presented Thursday at an American Heart Association meeting, in Chicago.

"High blood pressure -- even in childhood -- matters," said study author Dr. Andrew Michael South. He's an assistant professor of pediatric nephrology at Wake Forest School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, N.C.

"As a kid, if you have high blood pressure, you're at much higher risk of having high blood pressure as an adult -- as young as in your 20s or early 30s. And hypertension sets the stage for other bad health problems because it impacts the heart and kidneys," South explained in a meeting news release.

About 40 million Americans, including 6 million children and adolescents, lack regular access to nutritious food. That can lead to poor diet quality and increased salt intake, he said.

"We know that people who consume higher salt diets have a higher risk of developing and maintaining high blood pressure than those who eat normal amounts of salt," South said.

Research presented at meetings is typically considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information

The American Academy of Pediatrics has more on high blood pressure in children.

SOURCE: American Heart Association, news release, Sept. 6, 2018

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=737441

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Hypertension
Blood
Risk
Face
Heart
Association
Diet
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact