bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2018: J M A M F J
2017: D N O S A J J

 
  Other news for:
Aging
Environment
Multiple Sclerosis
Sunburn
Vitamins
 Resources from HONselect
Sunnier Days in Youth May Mean Less Odds of MS Later

By Robert Preidt

WEDNESDAY, March 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Living in sunnier climes when young might help shield you from multiple sclerosis decades later, new research suggests.

The main factor may be the sun's ultraviolet B (UV-B) rays, which help the body produce vitamin D, according to a Canadian team. They noted that lower levels of vitamin D have been associated with a rise in risk for multiple sclerosis (MS).

The finding isn't entirely new -- other studies have shown lower MS rates in sunnier regions. But, "our study went further, looking at exposure over a person's life span," explained lead study author Helen Tremlett, of the University of British Columbia in Vancouver.

Tremlett's team tracked the histories of 151 women with MS who were diagnosed at an average age of 40, and 235 women of similar age without MS. The women lived across the United States and nearly all were white.

Women who lived in sunnier regions and had the highest exposure to UV-B rays were 45 percent less likely to develop MS than those who lived in regions with the lowest UV-B exposure, the study found.

Sun exposure in youth was key: Women who lived in regions with the highest levels of UV-B exposure between the ages of 5 and 15 were 51 percent less likely to develop MS than those with the lowest UV-B exposure between ages 5 and 15, Tremlett's group found.

More time spent outdoors in summer in youth was similarly tied to lower MS rates decades later, the researchers reported March 7 in Neurology.

"Our research showed that those who did develop MS also had reduced sun or outdoor exposure later in life, in both summer and winter, which may have health consequences," Tremlett said in a journal news release.

Still, exposure to the sun's UV rays has a big down side, too: skin cancer. The American Cancer Society has long warned that tanning and burning, especially, are a prime cause of potentially deadly forms of the disease, such as melanoma.

Regarding the MS study, one expert said its findings are in tune with prior research.

"While geographic location during adolescence was previously known to be associated with MS risk, the current study demonstrates that sun exposure even later in life affects MS risk," said Dr. Asaff Harel, a neurologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

Harel noted, however, that almost all of the study group was white, so, "it will be interesting to determine whether the same relationship applies in a more multi-ethnic study."

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke has more on multiple sclerosis.

SOURCES: Asaff Harel, M.D., neurologist, Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City; Neurology, news release, March 7, 2018

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=731706

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Women
Multiple Sclerosis
Sclerosis
Risk
Neoplasms
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact