bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2018: D N O S A J J M A M F J
2017: D

 
  Other news for:
Skin Care
 Resources from HONselect
How to Get That Perfect Shave

By Robert Preidt

SUNDAY, Feb. 25, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Guys, a perfect shave may be more about preparation and technique than the actual razor.

"The perfect shave is a combination of art and trial and error," said Dr. Robert Anolik, a clinical assistant professor of dermatology at the New York University School of Medicine.

"That said, there are steps you can take to help ensure a clean and comfortable shave," he said in an American Academy of Dermatology news release.

First, wet your skin and hair to soften it. An ideal time to shave is immediately after a shower. Your skin will be warm, moist and free of excess oil and dead skin cells that can clog up your razor blade, Anolik said.

Use a foaming shaving cream. If your skin is very dry or easily irritated, choose one that's meant for sensitive skin.

"Using a circular motion, apply a small amount of the cream to your face using your fingers or a shave brush. A shave brush can help by lifting the hairs and more evenly coating them with the shaving cream," Anolik said.

Let the cream sit for two to three minutes, and then start shaving in the direction that your facial hair grows. This will help prevent razor bumps and burns. Rinse after each swipe of the razor.

Change your razor blade or throw away disposable razors after five to seven shaves, Anolik advised.

After you finish shaving, rinse your face with cold water to ease inflammation. Then apply a moisturizer with an SPF of 30 or higher.

Between shaves, make sure your razor dries completely to prevent growth of bacteria. Store it in a dry location.

"If you're using the right technique but still experiencing razor bumps, razor burns or ingrown hairs, consider switching razors," said Anolik.

"For some men, multi-blade razors can work too well, or shave too closely to their skin. Try using a single- or two-blade razor instead and do not stretch your skin taut while shaving," he suggested.

More information

The American Academy of Dermatology has more on men's skin care.

SOURCE: American Academy of Dermatology, news release, February 2018

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=731186

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Burns
Face
Skin Care
Men
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact