bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2018: D N O S A J J M A M F J
2017: D

 
  Other news for:
Street Drugs
 Resources from HONselect
Hip-Hop Music Blamed for Encouraging Drug Use

By Robert Preidt

MONDAY, March 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Hip-hop music may be influencing black Americans to try the street drug molly, a new study suggests.

Molly -- the powder or crystal form of ecstasy -- is a stimulant and hallucinogenic.

University of South Florida researchers surveyed young black adults who said they'd tried molly. The investigators found that 82 percent of them said hip-hop music had influenced their decision to try the drug.

The researchers noted that many hip-hop songs promote the drug as a way to party and reduce sexual inhibitions without the risks that come with such drugs as heroin and crack.

"Molly, although not as dangerous as opioids, has been linked to psychiatric problems, sexual risk taking and adverse health outcomes like seizures, irregular heartbeat, hyperthermia and even death," the study's lead author, Khary Rigg, said in a university news release. He's a professor of mental health law and policy at the school.

"The behaviors of millennial African Americans are probably the most likely to be influenced by hip-hop music as the artists themselves are typically from that demographic," Rigg said.

"This suggests that rappers may be effective sources for prevention, health promotion and harm-reduction messages aimed at African Americans," he added.

Previous studies have found that hip-hop music can influence listeners' use of alcohol and marijuana. But the researchers behind the new study said this was the first to find a link between hip-hop and molly.

The study was published online recently in the Journal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse.

More information

The U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse has more on ecstasy/molly.

SOURCE: University of South Florida, news release, February 2018

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=731104

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Research Personnel
Substance-Related Disorders
Specialty Chemicals and Products
Risk
Mental Health
Adult
Fever
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact