bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2018: M A M F J
2017: D N O S A J J M

 
  Other news for:
Aging
 Resources from HONselect
What Works Best to Keep Drivers With Dementia Off the Road

By Robert Preidt

FRIDAY, Feb. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Don't count on physicians to keep drivers with dementia off the roads, a new study cautions.

In-person license renewal and driver vision testing laws are more effective than mandatory doctor reporting of patients with dementia, researchers found.

"The results of our study point to age-based licensing requirements as an effective way to improve safety," said study co-author Steven Albert, of the University of Pittsburgh's Graduate School of Public Health.

"But such requirements also may cause social isolation and depression, and may be seen as ageist and discriminatory," said Albert, chair of behavioral and community health sciences.

Further study might determine the best approach to ensure safe driving without harming the mental health of older adults, he added in a university news release.

For this study, researchers analyzed 2004-09 data on nearly 137,000 older drivers in the United States who were hospitalized after a crash.

They found that hospitalized drivers, aged 60 to 69, in states with in-person license renewal laws were about 38 percent less likely to have dementia than those in states without such laws.

Also, in states with vision testing at license renewal, drivers were 23 to 28 percent less likely to have dementia than those in states without vision testing requirements, the study found.

Laws requiring doctors to report drivers with dementia were not linked with a lower chance of dementia among hospitalized older drivers, according to the study.

The findings were surprising "as we know that older drivers stop driving based on the advice of their physicians and, if reported to licensing authorities, few regain driving privileges," said study lead author Yll Agimi.

Agimi conducted the study while a doctoral student at Pitt Health.

The results were published Jan. 31 in the journal Neurology.

More information

The Family Caregiver Alliance has more on dementia and driving.

SOURCE: University of Pittsburgh, news release, Jan. 31 2018

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=730593

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Dementia
Caregivers
Research Personnel
Physicians
Mental Health
Adult
Social Isolation
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact