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Health Tip: Prevent Hypothermia Among Seniors

(HealthDay News) -- Seniors are at heightened risk of hypothermia, the medical term for low body temperature.

Older adults lose body heat faster than when they were younger, the U.S. National Institute on Aging says.

Hypothermia occurs when a person's body temperature drops to 95 degrees Fahrenheit or lower. Typical warning signs include slowed or slurred speech, sleepiness or confusion, shivering or stiffness in the arms and legs, poor control over body movements, slow reactions or a weak pulse.

The agency suggests how to prevent hypothermia in older adults:

  • Some prescription and over-the-counter meds may increase your risk for hypothermia. Ask your doctor if this pertains to you.
  • Set your home's thermostat to at least 68 degrees.
  • To stay warm at home, wear long underwear under your clothes, along with socks and slippers. Use a blanket to keep your legs and shoulders warm.
  • When going outside in the cold, wear a hat, scarf, gloves, along with several layers of loose clothing to trap warm air between the layers.
  • Carry a fully charged cellphone when you go out, and let someone know when you're venturing outside.

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=730316

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Hypothermia
Adult
Risk
Speech
Confusion
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


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