bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2018: A J J M A M F J
2017: D N O S A

 
  Other news for:
Emotions
Mental Health
 Resources from HONselect
Women Seem More Prone to Winter Blues

By Robert Preidt

MONDAY, Jan. 15, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The increase in depressive symptoms brought on by winter seems to occur more often in women than men, a new study finds.

Low mood, tiredness and the inability to gain pleasure from usually enjoyable activities peaked in the winter months, according to the researchers' analysis of data on more than 150,000 people in the United Kingdom. Most affected, they found, were women.

The shorter days of winter also were linked to more depressive symptoms in women, but the researchers said this may have been due to variations in outdoor temperatures.

The seasonal mood changes appeared to be independent of smoking, alcohol use and physical activity, the investigators said.

The findings provide "evidence of seasonal variations in depressive symptoms, which appear to be more pronounced in women than in men," said study author Daniel Smith, a psychiatry professor at the University of Glasgow in Scotland.

"We don't yet fully understand why this should be the case," he said in a university news release.

However, Smith said, "it was interesting that the changes were independent of social and lifestyle factors, perhaps suggesting a sex-specific biological mechanism.

"Clearly, this is a complex but important area which requires further study," he said.

"Clinicians should be aware of these population-level sex differences in seasonal mood variation to aid the recognition and treatment of depressive symptoms across the calendar year," Smith added.

The study was published online recently in the Journal of Affective Disorders.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Mental Health has more on seasonal affective disorder.

SOURCE: University of Glasgow, news release, Jan. 8, 2018

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=729998

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Women
Depression
Affect
Research Personnel
Mental Health
Mood Disorders
Men
Smoking
Motor Activity
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact