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Bone Treats a Dangerous Stocking Stuffer for Dogs

By Robert Preidt

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 29, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Even if he's a good boy, don't put bone treats in your dog's stocking this holiday season because they can pose a serious health risk to your pooch, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns.

The FDA said it has received reports of 68 pet illnesses and 15 deaths caused by bone treats. The reports included moldy-looking treats and bone treats that splintered when chewed by the dog.

Bone treats differ from uncooked butcher-type bones in that they are processed and packaged. They may be dried through smoking or baking, and they may contain ingredients such as preservatives, seasonings and smoke flavorings.

"Giving your dog a bone treat might lead to an unexpected trip to your veterinarian, a possible emergency surgery or even death for your pet," Dr. Carmela Stamper, a veterinarian in the Center for Veterinary Medicine at the FDA, said in an agency news release.

Potential risks include blockage in the digestive tract, choking, cuts and wounds in the mouth or on the tonsils, vomiting, diarrhea, and bleeding from the rectum.

"We recommend supervising your dog with any chew toy or treat, especially one she hasn't had before," Stamper said. "And if she 'just isn't acting right,' call your veterinarian right away!"

The FDA also reminded people with pets that regular bones -- especially turkey or chicken bones, which are brittle -- can be harmful and shouldn't be given to pets. It's also important to make sure that pets can't get at them in the garbage.

The bottom line? Talk with your veterinarian about toys or treats that would be best for your dog.

More information

The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals has more on dog care.

SOURCE: U.S. Food and Drug Administration, news release, Nov. 21, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=728733

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Bone and Bones
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The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


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