bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2018: S A J J M A M F J
2017: D N O S

 
  Other news for:
Brain
Fatigue
Pain
 Resources from HONselect
Gulf War Illness, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Are Distinct Disorders: Study

By Robert Preidt

FRIDAY, Nov. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The diagnosis and treatment of two conditions -- chronic fatigue syndrome and Gulf War illness -- could improve thanks to the discovery of distinct brain chemistry signatures in people with these disorders, researchers say.

The illnesses share symptoms such as pain, fatigue, thinking problems and exhaustion after exercise. They're often misdiagnosed as depression or other mental health problems, according to the study team from Georgetown University Medical Center in Washington, D.C.

The investigators found brain changes, specifically in levels of miRNAs -- which turn protein production on or off -- in people with one of the disorders who were given a spinal tap 24 hours after they exercised for 25 minutes.

"We clearly see three different patterns in the brain's production of these molecules in the [chronic fatigue syndrome] group and the two [Gulf War illness] phenotypes," said senior investigator Dr. James Baraniuk. He is a professor of medicine at Georgetown.

The miRNA levels in these disorders were different from the ones that are altered in depression, fibromyalgia and Alzheimer's disease, he said. Baraniuk described this as further confirmation that chronic fatigue syndrome and Gulf War illness are distinct diseases.

"This news will be well received by patients who suffer from these disorders who are misdiagnosed," he said in a university news release.

Chronic fatigue syndrome affects about a million Americans, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Previous research by Baraniuk found that more than one-quarter of the 697,000 U.S. veterans deployed to the 1990-1991 Persian Gulf War had developed Gulf War illness, according to the news release.

Gulf War veterans had been exposed to combinations of nerve agents, pesticides and other toxic chemicals that may have triggered chronic pain, thinking, gastrointestinal and other problems, Baraniuk said.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on chronic fatigue syndrome.

SOURCE: Georgetown University Medical Center, news release, Nov. 10, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=728383

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Fatigue
Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic
Syndrome
Brain
Research Personnel
Pain
Thinking
Depression
Veterans
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact