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Even Light Drinking May Raise Your Cancer Risk

By Robert Preidt

TUESDAY, Nov. 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Maybe you should skip that glass of wine tonight, because even light drinking increases your risk of cancer, warns a new statement from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).

"People typically don't associate drinking beer, wine and hard liquor with increasing their risk of developing cancer in their lifetimes," said ASCO President Dr. Bruce Johnson.

"However, the link between increased alcohol consumption and cancer has been firmly established and gives the medical community guidance on how to help their patients reduce their risk of cancer," he said in a society news release.

Alcohol is directly responsible for 5 to 6 percent of new cancers and cancer deaths worldwide, according to the statement. The paper cites evidence tying light, moderate or heavy drinking to higher risk of common malignancies such as breast, colon, esophagus, and head and neck cancers.

However, a recent ASCO survey found that 7 out of 10 Americans are unaware of a link between alcohol and cancer.

To reduce the risks, the statement includes several recommendations. They include tighter restrictions on the days and hours of alcohol sales; higher taxes on alcohol; limiting alcohol advertising to youth; and providing alcohol screening and treatment at medical visits.

The organization also wants to end the "pinkwashing" of alcoholic beverages. Since there's evidence linking breast cancer to drinking, companies shouldn't be "exploiting the color pink" or using pink ribbons to show their support of breast cancer research, the authors said.

"ASCO joins a growing number of cancer care and public health organizations in recognizing that even moderate alcohol use can cause cancer," said statement author Dr. Noelle LoConte. She's an associate professor of medicine at the University of Wisconsin.

"Therefore, limiting alcohol intake is a means to prevent cancer," she added. "The good news is that, just like people wear sunscreen to limit their risk of skin cancer, limiting alcohol intake is one more thing people can do to reduce their overall risk of developing cancer."

More information

The U.S. National Cancer Institute has more on alcohol and cancer.

SOURCE: American Society of Clinical Oncology, news release, Nov. 7, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=728258

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