bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: N O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D N

 
  Other news for:
Alcoholism
Depression
Physicians
Stress
Suicide
 Resources from HONselect
Surgical Residents Prime Candidates for Stress, Depression, Alcohol Abuse

By Robert Preidt

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Burnout is common among medical residents training to be surgeons, putting them at increased risk for alcohol abuse, anxiety, depression and suicidal thoughts, a new study suggests.

But a stress-countering technique called mindfulness may help them, the study authors added.

"Surgical trainees live in a culture where high stress is normative, but excessive stress must be addressed," said study lead author Dr. Carter Lebares, an assistant professor in the department of surgery at the University of California, San Francisco.

"While surgical trainees have willingly chosen a high-stress career, the existence of overwhelming stress is evidenced by the strong association between stress and distress symptoms like depression, suicidal thoughts and high anxiety," Lebares added in a university news release.

His team examined the responses of 566 surgical residents in the United States who completed a confidential online survey. About 69 percent reported burnout.

Moderate to severe depression was identified in 20 percent of the surgical residents (two times higher than in the general population). And suicidal thoughts were experienced by 11 percent of the residents (more than three times higher than in the general population).

The study also found that 53 percent of the residents had high levels of stress, 49 percent misused alcohol (more than five times higher than in the general population) and their rate of alcohol abuse or dependence was 33 percent, two times higher than among practicing surgeons.

Fortunately, the researchers found that mindfulness may help surgical residents cope with their job-related stress. Mindfulness was associated with an 85 percent lower risk for having high levels of stress.

The study was published recently in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons.

"Mindfulness isn't about thinking nicer thoughts -- it's about recognizing stressors, learning to pause and to assess those stressors in a less reactive and emotional way," said Lebares, director of the university's Center for Mindfulness in Surgery.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Mental Health has more on stress.

SOURCE: University of California, San Francisco, news release, Oct. 26, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=727953

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Depression
Alcoholism
Anxiety
Risk
Mental Health
Learning
Association
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact