bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: N O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D N

 
  Other news for:
Brain
Exercise
Wounds and Injuries
Sports Medicine
 Resources from HONselect
Hockey Study Suggests Injured Kids Sent Back on the Ice Too Soon
Brain changes persist at least 3 months after kids' concussions, study finds

By Dennis Thompson
HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- After-effects of a concussion continue to wrack the brains of young hockey players long after they appear ready to return to play, new research finds.

MRI scans of concussed teen hockey players revealed brain changes persist for at least three months -- weeks after other symptoms resolve and skaters are cleared to hit the ice, a Canadian research team found.

Scores on thinking and memory tests -- two current measures of recovery -- returned to normal about 24 days (on average) following a concussion, the study findings showed.

These results indicate that current clinical tests used to judge an athlete's recovery could be improved, said senior researcher Ravi Menon. He's a professor and chair of functional and molecular imaging with the University of Western Ontario's Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry.

"Clearly those tests are not very sensitive," Menon said. "Basically, the standard concussion guidelines would indicate it's OK to go back to play, but the MRI changes show the brain is still damaged and still trying to compensate."

The study involved 17 Canadian boys, aged 11 to 14, who sustained a concussion while playing in Bantam hockey leagues.

Each player underwent standard thinking, memory and balance testing following his concussion. The boys also had MRI brain scans -- most had one right after the concussion and another three months later.

All the players' scores on thinking and memory tests returned to normal before the three-month mark, ranging from 10 to 46 days.

But the three-month MRIs showed they still had signs of widespread damage to their white matter. The white matter serves as the wiring that allows different regions of the brain to communicate, Menon noted.

"We see damage to the wiring, and as a consequence of that we see a reduction in the communication between the areas that those wires connect," Menon said.

The researchers also found other areas of the brain trying to create new connections, apparently in an attempt to re-establish communication impeded by the white matter damage, Menon explained.

According to lead researcher Kathryn Manning, a doctoral student at the University of Western Ontario, "Those underlying white matter changes persist."

Menon said that the results call for better clinical tests that reveal whether the damaged white matter has fully re-established communications.

In the meantime, parents should consider keeping their kid out of play a little longer following a concussion, he suggested. There's some concern that brain damage can stack up in a youngster who receives additional knocks to the head while recovering from concussion.

"Probably the more pragmatic approach is to not rush a kid who is 12 years old back into a game the minute their clinical score is normalized," Menon said. "There's no multimillion-dollar athletic contract on the line at this point. Give them a chance to rest and recover, and then ease them back in."

That stance is a little too conservative for Dr. Anthony Alessi, a Norwich, Conn., neurologist and fellow of the American Academy of Neurology.

"The best clinical tools right now are the tests we have," Alessi said. "If your child feels they're back to normal, they're functioning well at school, neuropsychometric testing is normal, they've seen a physician and all clinical indications are that they're normal, I'd let them go back and play."

The best way parents can protect their child is to interview coaches to make sure they can recognize a concussion and place proper concern on removing injured children from play, Alessi said.

It also helps if there's medical expertise on site.

Studies have shown it's advantageous to have a certified athletic trainer working with the team, Alessi said. "Typically, a concussion will be recognized sooner and there will be intervention sooner," he added.

The study was published online Oct. 25 in the journal Neurology.

More information

For more on sports-related concussion, visit the American Academy of Pediatrics.

SOURCES: Ravi Menon, Ph.D., professor and chair, functional and molecular imaging, University of Western Ontario Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Ontario, Canada; Kathryn Manning, M.Sc., doctoral student, University of Western Ontario, Ontario, Canada; Anthony Alessi, M.D., Norwich, Conn., neurologist and fellow, American Academy of Neurology; Oct. 25, 2017, Neurology, online

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=727870

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Back
Brain
Wounds and Injuries
Thinking
Research Personnel
Memory
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact