bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: D N O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D

 
  Other news for:
Hormones
Love
Mental Health
 Resources from HONselect
Your Sociability May Hinge on 'Love Hormone'
Oxytocin confers evolutionary advantages, study finds

By Robert Preidt

FRIDAY, Sept. 29, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- If you like to hang out with friends, it might be due to the "love hormone" oxytocin, a new mouse study suggests.

Oxytocin promotes socialization by triggering pleasurable feelings when people get together, said Stanford University researchers.

"Our study reveals new insights about the brain circuitry behind social reward, the positive experience you often get when you run into an old friend or meet somebody you like," said study senior author Dr. Robert Malenka. He's associate chair of psychiatry and behavioral science at Stanford's School of Medicine.

"The reward circuitry is crucial to our survival because it rewards us for doing things that have, during our evolutionary history, tended to enhance our survival, our reproduction and the survival of our resulting offspring," he explained in a university news release.

For example, when you're hungry, food tastes great, he pointed out. "When you're thirsty, water is refreshing. Sex is great pretty much most of the time," he added.

Hanging out with friends has historically conferred a survival advantage, too, by decreasing the odds of getting eaten by predators, increasing chances of finding a mate and maybe helping to learn where food and water are, Malenka said.

He and his colleagues conducted a series of lab experiments that examined oxycontin's role in social behavior. Their findings were published Sept. 29 in the journal Science.

The findings could lead to new ways to help people who have difficulty socializing, including those with autism and schizophrenia, according to the researchers.

More information

The American Psychological Association has more on oxytocin.

SOURCE: Stanford University, news release, Sept. 28, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=726892

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Hormones
Love
Reward
Research Personnel
Water
Mental Health
Autistic Disorder
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Inicio img Sobre nosotros img Rincón de la prensa img Boletín HON img Mapa del sitio img Política ética img Contactos