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Carbon Monoxide a Potential Threat From Gas-Powered Generators
Don't use these devices in your home, garage or any enclosed space

By Robert Preidt

FRIDAY, Sept. 29, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- People left without power by storms or power outages may be at risk for carbon monoxide poisoning if they use portable generators, gas-powered appliances or gas grills improperly, U.S. officials warn.

Carbon monoxide (CO) is an odorless, colorless gas that can cause illness and death if it builds up inside a home or vehicle. Each year, more than 400 people in the United States die from accidental CO poisoning.

If you're using a generator or any gasoline-powered engine, place it at least 20 feet away from your home. Never use a generator, pressure washer or any gasoline-powered engine inside your home, basement or garage, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said.

When using a generator, also use a battery-powered or battery backup CO detector. If you have a professionally installed and vented generator system, keep vents and flues free of debris, especially if there are strong winds. Flying debris can block ventilation lines.

Never use a gas range or oven to heat a home, and never leave the motor running in a vehicle parked in an enclosed or partially enclosed space, such as a garage.

Signs of CO poisoning include headache, dizziness, weakness, nausea, vomiting, chest pain and confusion.

If you suspect carbon monoxide poisoning, get outside for fresh air, call 911 or your local Poison Control Center at 1-800-222-1222, or seek medical care immediately, the CDC said.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on carbon monoxide poisoning.

SOURCE: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, news release

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=726727

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Carbon
Carbon Monoxide
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Carbon Monoxide Poisoning
Power (Psychology)
Dizziness
Confusion
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


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