bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: D N O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D

 
  Other news for:
Breast Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Exercise

Fatigue
Sleep Disorders
 Resources from HONselect
Yoga May Bring Better Sleep to Breast Cancer Patients
As little as two times a week seemed to make a difference over long term

By Robert Preidt

FRIDAY, Sept. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A certain type of yoga may provide lasting benefits for breast cancer patients who have trouble sleeping, researchers report.

The study included 227 women undergoing chemotherapy for breast cancer who were randomly assigned to one of three groups. One group practiced Tibetan yoga at least twice a week, another group did a simple stretching program, and the third group received usual care (the "control" group).

The study participants were assessed one week after the end of the program, and the researchers followed up with them at three, six and 12 months later.

Women in the yoga group reported fewer sleep problems and less daytime drowsiness over the long term than those in the other two groups, the researchers said.

Sleep problems and fatigue are common among cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, said study author Lorenzo Cohen. He is director of the integrative medicine program at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer.

The women in the Tibetan yoga program or the stretching program had been offered four 75- to 90-minute classes during their chemotherapy treatment.

Those taking part in Tibetan yoga were taught one-on-one by a trained instructor. The women in this group were taught controlled breathing, visualization, meditation and postures, and were encouraged to practice yoga daily at home.

"While the effects of this intervention were modest, it is encouraging to see that the women who practiced yoga outside of class had improved sleep outcomes over time," Cohen said in an MD Anderson l news release.

"Previous research has established that yoga effectively reduces sleep disturbances for cancer patients, but have not included active control groups or long-term follow-up. This study hoped to address previous study limitations," he added.

The study was published online Sept. 20 in the journal Cancer.

More information

Harvard Medical School has more on yoga.

SOURCE: University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, news release, Sept. 20, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=726718

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Neoplasms
Sleep
Breast
Breast Neoplasms
Women
Research Personnel
Drug Therapy
Fatigue
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Inicio img Sobre nosotros img Rincón de la prensa img Boletín HON img Mapa del sitio img Política ética img Contactos