bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: D N O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D

 
  Other news for:
Air Pollution
 Resources from HONselect
Dirty Air Might Harm Your Kidneys
Study finds link between so-called particle pollution and renal function

By Robert Preidt

THURSDAY, Sept. 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Air pollution may harm your kidneys, a new study says.

"Even levels below the limit set by the [Environmental Protection Agency] were harmful to the kidneys. This suggests that there is no safe level of air pollution," said study leader Dr. Ziyad Al-Aly.

Al-Aly is director of clinical epidemiology at the VA Saint Louis Health Care System.

He and his colleagues analyzed data from nearly 2.5 million U.S. military veterans who were followed for roughly 8.5 years. They found that as exposure to particulate matter air pollution increased, so did the risk of poorer kidney function, kidney disease and kidney failure.

Particle pollution refers to a complex mix of extremely small particles, such as soot, dirt and smoke, and liquid droplets found in the air, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. It's already known that inhaling these particles can affect the heart and lungs.

The results suggest that each year in the United States, almost 45,000 new cases of chronic kidney disease and more than 2,400 new cases of kidney failure are associated with particle pollution exceeding the EPA recommended limit.

The study found the strongest link between air pollution and kidney damage in southern California and large swaths of the Midwest, the Northeast, and the South, according to Al-Aly.

However, the researchers can only point to an association between air pollution and kidney disease, not a specific causal relationship.

The results were published online Sept. 21 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

The findings may help explain the large variation in kidney disease rates worldwide, Al-Aly said in a journal news release.

Previous research has linked air pollution with shorter life expectancy, the researchers said in background notes.

More information

The World Health Organization has more on air pollution.

SOURCE: Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, news release, Sept. 21, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=726653

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Kidney
Kidney Diseases
Research Personnel
Association
Affect
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Inicio img Sobre nosotros img Rincón de la prensa img Boletín HON img Mapa del sitio img Política ética img Contactos