bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D N O

  U.S. Seniors Getting Healthier, Especially When Wealthy and White

By Robert Preidt

MONDAY, Sept. 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- American seniors are getting healthier overall, but the well-educated, rich and white are seeing the greatest gains, a new study finds.

Researchers reviewed federal government data on more than 55,000 older adults. They found that between 2000 and 2014, there was a 14 percent increase in the rate of those who reported good health.

However, those with graduate degrees had the most improvement -- 56 more healthy people per thousand -- while the rate remained flat among those with only a high school diploma.

Rich seniors had the best rate of good health throughout the study period, with the rate increasing from 490 per 1,000 to 603 per 1,000.

Overall, 52 percent of older adults with good health had high incomes. Just 31 percent of those with poor health had high incomes.

Whites were more likely than blacks or Hispanics to have good health. The rate of good health among whites rose from 442 per 1,000 to 533 per 1,000 during the study. The rate of good health among blacks and Hispanics remained flat, but the rate did increase among other racial/ethnic groups.

Study author Matthew Davis said he was "amazed" at the obvious health disparities based on race, income and education.

"The widening health disparities is particularly striking because older Americans have access to health care [through Medicare]," said Davis, an assistant professor at the University of Michigan's School of Nursing.

"Policies have to extend beyond just getting people access to health care to get at what's driving disparities. The lack of improvement in health among all groups could imply that public health initiatives are leaving some people behind," he added in a university news release.

The study was published online Sept. 18 in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers resources on healthy aging.

SOURCE: University of Michigan, news release, Sept. 18, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=726645

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Adult
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Home img About us img MediaCorner img HON newsletter img Site map img Ethical policies img Contact