bannerHON
img
HONnews
HONnews
img PATIENT / PARTICULIER img PROFESSIONNEL DE SANTE img WEBMESTRE img
img
 
img
HONcode sites
Khresmoi - new !
HONselect
News
Conferences
Images

Themes:
A B C D E F G H I
J K L M N O P Q
R S T U V W X Y Z
Browse archive:
2017: D N O S A J J M A M F J
2016: D

 
  Other news for:
Diabetes Mellitus
Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent
Diabetes Mellitus, Non-Insulin-Dependent
Food
 Resources from HONselect
Increasing Salt Intake Tied to Diabetes Risk
Odds of both type 2 and latent autoimmune diabetes rose when adults consumed more salt, study shows

By Robert Preidt

THURSDAY, Sept. 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- High levels of salt consumption may increase an adult's risk of developing diabetes, researchers say.

The new study included data from a few thousand people in Sweden. The findings showed that salt intake was associated with an average 65 percent increase in the risk of developing type 2 diabetes for each 2.5 extra grams of salt (slightly less than half a teaspoon) consumed per day.

People with the highest salt intake (about 1.25 teaspoons of salt or higher) were 72 percent more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those with the lowest intake, the investigators found.

The study, led by Bahareh Rasouli of the Institute of Environmental Medicine at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, was scheduled for presentation Thursday at the annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Lisbon, Portugal.

The current study didn't look at how salt might increase the risk of diabetes. But the researchers suggested that increasing salt intake may spur insulin resistance, a condition that can lead to type 2 diabetes. Or, it could be that salt intake was related to a higher weight.

The study can't prove a direct cause-and-effect relationship, only an association.

High salt consumption was also associated with a significantly increased risk of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults, a form of type 1 diabetes that develops very slowly and appears in adulthood.

The study findings may prove important in efforts to prevent diabetes in adults, the researchers said in an EASD news release.

Findings presented at meetings are generally viewed as preliminary until they've been published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases has more on diabetes.

SOURCE: European Association for the Study of Diabetes, news release, Sept. 14, 2017

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. URL:http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=726488

Resources from HONselect: HONselect is the HON's medical search engine. It retrieves scientific articles, images, conferences and web sites on the selected subject.
Risk
Adult
Research Personnel
Association
Lead
The list of medical terms above are retrieved automatically from the article.

Disclaimer: The text presented on this page is not a substitute for professional medical advice. It is for your information only and may not represent your true individual medical situation. Do not hesitate to consult your healthcare provider if you have any questions or concerns. Do not use this information to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified healthcare professional.
Be advised that HealthDay articles are derived from various sources and may not reflect your own country regulations. The Health On the Net Foundation does not endorse opinions, products, or services that may appear in HealthDay articles.


Inicio img Sobre nosotros img Rincón de la prensa img Boletín HON img Mapa del sitio img Política ética img Contactos